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Surprising shape

Rosetta images reveal that Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's nucleus consists of two distinctly separate parts

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Reliving Apollo 11

EXCLUSIVE! How one small step became a giant leap

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3-D outburst

The first high-res model of the expanding cloud from Eta Carinae

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Starmus 2014 Rocks Astronomy!

Join astronomy’s greatest minds in the Canary Islands, September 22–27, 2014. New speakers continue to be announced!

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Black hole fireworks

Jets from M106's black hole reduce the available gas for star formation

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Astronomy is available on the App Store!

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Organic conundrum

Life building blocks found in LMC stars are more varied

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Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

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Faroe Islands Eclipse

Join Astronomy magazine and MWT Associates, Inc., March 14–23, 2015, as they take in totality from these unspoiled North Atlantic islands. Learn more »

Summer shower

The Southern Delta Aquariid meteor shower sparkles in late July

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Surprising shape

The saturnian moon's building blocks might predate the ringed planet

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Surprising shape

Rosetta images reveal that Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's nucleus consists of two distinctly separate parts

Learn more »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

Solstice eve Sun

This image of the Sun demonstrates why you always should try to observe celestial objects when they lie high in the sky. Notice how our atmosphere near the horizon acts like a series of lenses to break up the Sun’s image. (Canon EOS 6D DSLR, ISO 250, 1/2500-second exposure, taken June 21, 2014, from Caernarfon Bay, North West Wales)
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