Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '
FallSky2015_sliderlarge

Fun fall sky events

Stunning planetary lineups, a total lunar eclipse, spectacular meteor showers, and more — your guide to the fall sky

Watch now »

Take the Universe With You!

Double trouble

Hubble finds that the nearest quasar is powered by a double black hole

Learn more »

P25368_563x462

Sign Up for Astronomy's five-part Observing Essentials email series!

Hubble at 25

How the space telescope changed the cosmos

Learn more »

Radio phoenix

A faded electron cloud comes back to life after galaxy collision

Learn more »

BaliRotator

Indonesian Islands Eclipse

Explore Bali and witness a total solar eclipse in March 2016 with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

View the brochure »

The latest interview

Seth Shostak: Life in the Universe

Listen now »

Two is better than one

The remarkable complexity of the bipolar Twin Jet Nebula

Learn more »

RealRealityShow_sliderlarge

New episode every other week!

Turn on your mind to what's really going on in the universe

Watch now »

Get timely coverage of the heavens above

Icy exploration

NASA’s next big spacecraft mission could visit an ice giant

Learn more »

564x453_SoA_RB

Exclusive podcast series

Editor David J. Eicher conducts extensive interviews with the world's top astrophysicists, planetary scientists, and cosmologists

Listen now »

Sharper scenes

Dawn reveals exciting new views from Ceres

Learn more »

Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

Learn more »

Fun fall sky events

Stunning planetary lineups, a total lunar eclipse, spectacular meteor showers, and more — your guide to the fall sky

Watch now »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

Mizar and Alcor

Mizar (Zeta Ursae Majoris) and Alcor (80 Ursae Majoris) make up probably the sky’s most famous double star. You can find them at the bend of the Big Dipper’s handle. Sharp-eyed observers can separate them with just their naked eyes. The two stars lie roughly 90 light-years from Earth. (Astro Systeme Austria ASA 10N astrograph at f/3.7, SBIG STL-11000M CCD camera, LRGB image with 10-minute exposures through each filter)
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Loading...