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Spooky alignment

The rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other

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Dawn mission images create geological maps of Vesta

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Astro 101: Cosmic Rays

Subatomic particles with ridiculous amounts of energy

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Sunny seas

Cassini catches bright sunlight reflecting off Titan's lakes

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Spooky alignment

The rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other

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Mare Marginis

Mare Marginis is a lunar sea that lies on the edge of the lunar nearside. The name is Latin for “Sea of the Edge.” It can be tough to see well due to its location on the edge. This mare differs from most on the nearside. It has an irregular outline and appears to be fairly thin with small circular and elongated features in the mare plains that probably mark impact craters buried by lava. (10-inch Meade Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope at f/6.3, QHYCCD QHY 5IIL CCD camera, 5.6-millisecond exposures at 15 frames per second, best 65 percent of 400 frames stacked, taken November 2, 2014, from Dayton, Ohio)
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