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February 2014

ASY-CV0214
The world's best-selling astronomy magazine offers you the most exciting, visually stunning, and timely coverage of the heavens above. Each monthly issue includes expert science reporting, vivid color photography, complete sky coverage, spot-on observing tips, informative telescope reviews, and much more! All this in an easy-to-understand, user-friendly style that's perfect for astronomers at any level.

Features

Does methane flow on Titan?

Scientists are eager to prove that the river valleys and streambeds on Saturn’s largest moon carry liquid methane to its vast lakes.

Titan's rivers run deep

When the European Space Agency’s Huygens spacecraft descended through the thick atmosphere of Saturn’s largest moon, it revealed vast lakes apparently fed by flowing rivers of liquid methane.

Searching for smart life around small stars

Researchers have set their sights on red dwarfs in hopes of making a big discovery.

Web Extra: What happens when we detect alien life?

Seth Shostak, the man who will know first, describes what will happen if E.T. phones Earth.

New light on our Sun's fate

The Sun will lose 46 percent of its mass before becoming a carbon and oxygen cinder in 6.5 billion years. Here’s how astronomers know its destiny.

Web Extra: View the beauty of stellar death

A star similar to the Sun will end its life as a planetary nebula surrounding a white dwarf.

Comet ISON’s opening act

The most anticipated comet in decades got off to a good start.

Where other astrophotographers fear to tread

Thomas V. Davis is committed to shedding light on the dusty, dark parts of the universe through his portraits of nebulae.

Web Extra: Imaging the sky’s spooky reflection nebulae

Thomas V. Davis has made a project of capturing the objects in the van den Bergh catalog.

What are we learning from cosmic dust?

Tiny particles in the solar system may answer some of its biggest questions.

Astronomy tests Levenhuk’s new refractor

The Ra R110 ED Doublet OTA offers high-quality optics, good portability, and nice styling — all at a great price.

Explore the Trumpler classes of clusters

Since 1930, astronomers have divided the thousands of open clusters into 36 types. Find out what makes them different.

Web Extra: Open cluster extravaganza

Roam through the various classifications of these easy-to-observe objects.

Departments

StarDome and Path of the Planets

In Every Issue

From the Editor
Breakthrough
Astro News
Web Talk
Advertiser Index
Snapshot
Letters
New Products
Reader Gallery
Final Frontier
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