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As I understand, a star will “blow away” any remaining gas and dust in the immediate area once it begins fusion. So why can some stars collect billions of times more mass before blowing away the remainder of their embryonic material?

Bill Abel, Aurora, Colorado
RELATED TOPICS: STARS
30doradus
All stars are born in clusters out of cold molecular clouds. Within each cluster, the formed stars occupy a range of stellar masses. Typically, stars with the mass of the Sun outnumber those some eight times heavier by about tenfold. This distribution of stellar masses is called the initial mass function (IMF), and astronomers have found that it appears to be a universal value.


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