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Where does the iron in the Sun come from?

Bob Schofield, Portland, Oregon
RELATED TOPICS: SUN | SUPERNOVAE
Exploding stars called supernovae produce most of the universe's heavy elements, including iron.

Observers commonly express the Sun’s composition by the percentage of total number of atoms. Ignoring the solar core, where hydrogen fuses to helium, the Sun’s outer layers consist of more than 91 percent hydrogen and more than 8 percent helium (all the former and most of the latter made within the first few minutes after the Big Bang). The rest of the chemical elements constitute just 0.15 percent or so of the number of atoms in the Sun.

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