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Could the mass of all the black holes and planetary bodies be a significant portion of the missing dark matter in the universe?

Colt de Wolf, Seattle
RELATED TOPICS: DARK MATTER
dark matter mass
We know the total amount of material made of atoms is around one-fifth of the total amount of dark matter, the invisible mass in the universe. So nothing that is made of atoms, or that ever was made of atoms, can be a significant portion of dark matter. This rules out planets, dim and dead stars, etc., which are made of atoms. This result comes from many astronomical measurements using different techniques: the remnant microwave glow that fills the cosmos, deuterium (aka heavy hydrogen) abundances in distant galaxies, and direct searches for these objects.

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