Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

The Honey Moon experiment

What’s in a name?
bob_berman_2009

This past January, several radio stations asked me to talk about the “Blue Super Blood Moon” — winter’s biggest astronomical event, judging by media interest. But in the January issue of this magazine, there was not one specific mention of a Blue Super Blood Moon, other than noting January 31 would bring a lunar eclipse in the inconvenient pre-dawn hours. Obviously, the event’s high public interest was out of sync with the low importance it received from astronomy enthusiasts and professionals.

Maybe we should look at this phenomenon. After all, astronomers would love to see a wider interest in the night sky. But the dichotomy between “us” and “them” can’t be ignored. It shows itself on public viewing nights when half the visitors ask, “What power is your telescope?” and we wearily explain that the power changes whenever we switch eyepieces — and that low power often gives a better view than high. They’re then baffled that we never point telescopes at the Full Moon.

Astronomy magazine subscribers can read the full article for free. Just make sure you're registered with the website.

Already a subscriber? Register now!

Registration is FREE and takes only a few seconds to complete. If you are already registered on Astronomy.com, please log in below.
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
RCLP_ASY_WorldEnd_rightrail

Click here to receive a FREE e-Guide exclusively from Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook