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Mars in daylight, no telescope needed

You won’t be the first to spot the Red Planet when the Sun’s up.
OMearaStephen
The naked-eye appearance of Mars has captivated humanity since the emergence of human thought. That’s why I found the following comment by E.B. Knobel (in a letter to the journal The Observatory, dated February 8, 1910) strange: “I do not think there is anything remarkable in the ‘Naked-eye Observation of Mars during Sunlight’ [mentioned] in the current issue.” As proof, Knobel submitted two drawings showing Mars in June 1873 (then 15" in diameter) “when the Sun was shining brightly upon me,” adding that “it was bright enough to have been easily detected by even the most casual observer with the unaided eye.”

Then I read the Editors’ comment below: “We regret that we are unable to reproduce Mr. Knobel’s sketches of Mars . . . which show prominent surface details quite plainly.”

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