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Weird Object: Galaxy Cluster CLG J02182–05102

No. 18: Older Than It Should Be

ID
MAY I SEE YOUR ID?  Among the most distant galaxy clusters, CLG J02182–05102 seems strangely constructed of modern members. It’s like excavating beneath Egypt’s pyramids and finding a Mercedes. 
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Subaru

The smallest things in the universe are quarks, electrons, and neutrinos — fundamental particles that cannot be further divided into anything else, so far as we know. Going the opposite way, like Alice, galaxy clusters constitute nature’s largest entities. These star cities, bound by their mutual gravity, can span more than 100 million light-years. 

The question is: Do galaxy clusters evolve over time? The answer should provide us with vital clues to the nature of the universe. After all, if the old steady state theory is correct, the cosmos should eternally appear more or less the same forever. Galaxies stretch into the distance, while new ones form from the steady accumulation of tiny amounts of new material that pop into existence out of empty space, at a rate too small to be noticed. 

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