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Could the huge gamma-ray bubbles that extend above and below the center of the Milky Way be a boundary of matter and antimatter, whose collision emits gamma rays?

Pranathi Swamy, Andhra Pradesh, India
Gammy-ray-bubbles
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

The only way to produce photons at energies much higher than about 1,000 MeV (which is solidly in the gamma-ray range) is to have protons moving at nearly the speed of light. Although we’re still not positive what causes the Milky Way’s bubbles, matter-antimatter collisions are not a possibility.

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