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Earth shows its true colors

Rosetta's OSIRIS camera has captured true color images of Earth.
Provided by ESA, Noordwijk, Netherlands
This image of Earth was taken by OSIRIS on Nov.15.
ESA/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
November 21, 2007
Rosetta captured new pictures of Earth on Nov. 13 during a swing-by of our planet, and on Nov. 15 as Rosetta left on its way to the outer Solar System, after a swing-by.

After its closest approach to Earth, Rosetta looked back and took a number of images using the OSIRIS Narrow Angle Camera (NAC).

The image to the right was acquired Nov. 15 at 3:30 CET. The image is a color composite of the NAC orange, green, and blue filters. At the bottom of the image, the continent of Australia can be seen clearly.
This image of Earth's night-side was taken Nov. 13.
ESA/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
During the swing-by, the OSIRIS also observed Earth's night-side. The image to the left shows a simulated view of Earth as seen from the position of Rosetta, just before the spacecraft's closest approach to Earth. It was acquired Nov. 13 at 20:30 CET using the Wide Angle Camera (WAC) with a red filter.
This night view of Earth was taken Nov. 13.
ESA/MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
The picture to the right is another image of Earth's night-side. The picture was taken with the OSRIS WAC. It is shown in false color to emphasize city lights seen at night. The image was taken Nov. 13 at 20:30 using a red filter.
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