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National Astronomy Day 2008

Astronomy magazine, Meade Instruments Corp., and science centers throughout the United States unite May 10 to celebrate the sky.
National Astronomy Day 2008
May 9, 2008
National Astronomy Day provides the perfect opportunity for families to learn how to observe stars, planets, and comets. On this day, May 10, Astronomy magazine and Meade Instruments Corp. join forces with the country's most prestigious planetaria and science museums to put on the year's biggest star party.

"This is the astronomy world's biggest day of the year," says Astronomy Editor Dave Eicher, "and we enjoy sharing the wonders of the universe with thousands of people across the country."

Experts at the 26 locations — including Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Miami, Salt Lake City, and San Diego — will inspire and engage participants with demonstrations, hands-on activities, planetarium shows, telescopic observing, and more. These events will showcase the visually stunning and mind-boggling sights of deep space.

Astronomy will provide free printed material — perfect resources for family camping trips, homework assignments, and scout troop projects. Visitors to these 26 events can enter a drawing to win a Meade telescope.

Astronomy and Meade are committed to developing and sponsoring events like National Astronomy Day to stimulate public interest in science, exploration, discovery, and imagination.

The Astronomy/Meade program is just one of many events that celebrate National Astronomy Day throughout the country. Hundreds of local astronomy clubs host programs in their communities to help increase awareness of science and astronomy. For more information on these events, visit the Astronomical League's National Astronomy Day page.

Astronomy Day celebrations began in 1973, when California amateur astronomer Douglas Berger hosted an event at the Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland. Berger wanted to introduce the public to the hobby and science of astronomy. Thirty-five years later, hundreds of local astronomy clubs and science organizations now celebrate National Astronomy Day by introducing kids and adults to the infinite wonders of our universe.
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