Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

Ares I-X launch delayed until Wednesday

The Ares I-X launch team is preparing for a 24-hour turnaround, targeting 8 a.m. on Wednesday as liftoff time for the Ares I-X flight test vehicle.
Provided by NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C.
Ares I-X rocket on Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center
The perimeter fence on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is closed following the arrival of the towering 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket following its seven-hour early-morning trek.
NASA/Kim Shiflett
October 27, 2009
Tuesday's launch attempt was plagued by weather issues, even though the vehicle itself was ready to fly. After multiple attempts to reset to new launch times during the 4-hour window, the final scrub came when the weather did not improve as the end of the window neared. Tomorrow's weather improves somewhat, with a 40 percent "no-go."

Wednesday's attempt will have the same 4-hour window that ends at noon, and live coverage will also begin again at 5 a.m. EDT.

The Ares I rocket is being designed to carry astronauts to space in the Orion crew exploration vehicle. The Ares I-X test flight also will allow NASA to gather critical data during ascent of the vehicle's integrated stack, which includes the Ares I with a simulated upper stage, Orion and launch abort system. Data collected from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will begin to confirm the vehicle as a whole is safe and stable in flight before astronauts begin traveling into orbit.

More coverage of Ares I-X rocket on Astronomy.com.
0

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Read and share your comments on this article
Comment on this article
Want to leave a comment?
Only registered members of Astronomy.com are allowed to comment on this article. Registration is FREE and only takes a couple minutes.

Login or Register now.
0 comments
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
BoxProductcovernov

Click here to receive a FREE e-Guide exclusively from Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook

Loading...