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The Full Moon turns copper

October 2004: All the bright planets now have migrated to the morning sky, but evening observers can follow asteroids, comets, and variable stars — and watch Earth's shadow creep across the Moon's visage.
October 2004
A nearly perfect total eclipse of the Moon graces the sky above North and South America as well as Europe the evening of October 27. The Moon moves slowly through Earth's shadow, changing its clothing from a dazzling white to a deep orange veil and back again. A dark bite first appears at 9:14 p.m. EDT and grows to swallow our celestial neighbor completely for 80 minutes beginning at 10:23 p.m. This will be the last total lunar eclipse visible anywhere in the world until March 2007, so it's worth traveling a bit to avoid clouds.

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