Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

The Moon caresses the Pleiades

April 2006: The setting stars of winter provide one last hurrah as the Moon skates through the Pleiades star cluster. Later in the month, a waning crescent Moon hardly hinders the Lyrid meteor shower.
No fooling — on April 1, you can experience one of the most beautiful conjunctions the sky can deliver. Around 7 P.M. local time, some 45 minutes after sunset, look west to see a perfect "old Moon in the new Moon's arms." Point your binoculars at it to reveal a stunning sight: the bright Pleiades star cluster sparkling like a clutch of tiny diamonds accenting the primary jewel.

The ashen light filling out the Moon's disk comes from sunlight reflecting off Earth's dayside up to the Moon, and then back to us. Literally, the Moon is bathed in earthshine. If it appears particularly bright, you can trace some lunar seas and bright craters through a small telescope.

Already a subscriber? Register now!

Registration is FREE and takes only a few seconds to complete. If you are already registered on Astronomy.com, please log in below.
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
BoxProductcovernov

Click here to receive a FREE e-Guide exclusively from Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook

Loading...