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Jupiter meets Uranus at dawn

June 2010: In the Northern Hemisphere, the Sun will be at its highest point in the sky at local noon. Conversely, the ecliptic hangs lowest in the sky at local midnight.
June 2010 Jupiter finder chart
Brilliant Jupiter guides you to Uranus early this month. The two appear closest around their June 6 conjunction, but they remain close neighbors for a couple of weeks.
Astronomy: Roen Kelly
June 21 marks the first day of summer in the Northern Hemisphere. This places the Sun at its highest point in the sky at local noon. Conversely, the ecliptic — the apparent path of the Sun and planets across the sky — hangs lowest in the sky at local midnight.

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