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Meet a small, awesome imaging scope

Stellarvue's SV70T 2 3/4-inch refractor is lightweight and gorgeous — with a bonus of high-quality images.
RELATED TOPICS: STELLARVUE | TELESCOPES
Stellarvue's SV70T 2 3/4-inch refractor
The Stellarvue SV70T is an apochromatic refractor in a small package. The telescope measures 143/4 inches (37.5 centimeters) fully extended and weighs only 4.4 pounds (2 kilograms).
Astronomy: William Zuback
Do you like the idea of wide-field views through the eyepiece? Does shooting highly corrected large astroimages with modest size sensors appeal to you? If yes, then the SV70T, a new offering from Stellarvue, may fit
your needs. I had the opportunity to test this new scope recently, and I wasn’t
disappointed.

Initial impressions
The SV70T is a 23/4-inch (70 millimeters) f/6 apochromatic triplet refractor made with an FPL-53 fluorite center element, and triple-tested by Vic Maris and the team at Stellarvue. It provides sharp views and excellent color in a small package.

When I first opened the padded carrying case, I was surprised at the small size of this scope. It measures a scant 143/4 inches (37.5 centimeters) long with the dew cap extended and 12 inches (30.5cm) long when it’s retracted. I was pleasantly surprised when I looked at the focuser. Instead of the typical 2" focuser found on most small scopes, a larger Stellarvue 2.5" dual-speed focuser comes standard. You can manually rotate and lock the end of the focuser into place. The company also includes a nice set of machined rings and a Vixen-style dovetail plate.

If, on the other hand, you use a Losmandy-style dovetail plate, Stellarvue offers a set of 1.5" riser blocks that attach to the rings. The blocks raise the scope, allowing some added space between it and the dovetail plate. This comes in handy when attaching cameras or accessories to the scope and when you’re balancing it.
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