Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

Astronomy 101: Neutron stars

In this video, explore the various superdense remnants of massive stars, which hold between 1 and 3 times the Sun’s mass and are so dense that a teaspoon of their matter weighs about a billion tons.
CasA
Cassiopeia A is one example of a supernova remnant with a central neutron star — the central turquoise dot in this image.
X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: NASA/STScI; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Steward/O. Krause, et al.
A neutron star is a superdense remnant of a massive sun. A star that holds at least 8 times the Sun’s mass will burn through its material much faster than the Sun will. This massive star will then die dramatically as a supernova. This explosive event tears layers of gas away from the star, leaving behind its dense core.

The leftover neutron star is about 12 miles (20 kilometers) in diameter and holds between 1 and 3 times the Sun’s mass, approximately. It’s so dense that a teaspoon of this matter weighs about a billion tons. A neutron star’s density increases toward its center, where it holds a fluid of electrons, protons, and neutrons.

The full text of this article is available to registered users of Astronomy.com. Register now!

Registration is FREE and takes only a few seconds to complete. If you are already registered on Astronomy.com, please log in below.
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ExploringTheUniverseBlock_3.19.15

Click here to receive a FREE e-Guide exclusively from Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook

Loading...