Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

Did Supernova 1987A leave behind a pulsar?

Astronomers feel confident SN 1987A left behind a rapidly spinning neutron star. Despite extensive searches and a few false detections, however, the quest to find it has turned up empty.
The physics of a core-collapse supernova is pretty straightforward. Once a star weighing more than about 8 solar-masses has cycled through its available nuclear fuel, its core ends up as an inert ball of iron. The core's mass continually increases as silicon in the overlying layer continues to fuse and dump more iron onto the core. Once the pressure exerted by electrons can no longer support the mounting weight, the core collapses.

Already a subscriber? Register now!

Registration is FREE and takes only a few seconds to complete. If you are already registered on Astronomy.com, please log in below.
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
BoxProductcovernov

Click here to receive a FREE e-Guide exclusively from Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook

Loading...