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Citizen science and Epsilon Aurigae

Amateur observers can make important contributions to the scientific observing campaign focusing on Epsilon Aurigae.
Epsilon Aurigae
Epsilon Aurigae is one of the brightest stars in the constellation Auriga the Charioteer. It dims every 27.1 years as seen from Earth, but scientists are still unsure what causes the change in brightness.
Bill and Sally Fletcher
The ongoing eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae is predicted to continue until spring 2011. It's been 27 years since the last eclipse, and astronomers need all the information they can get. Amateur observers can make a contribution to the 2009-2011 scientific campaign.

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