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On the hunt for neutrinos

Many facilities have been involved in searching for these mysterious particles.
December 2009 Super-Kamiokande
Super-Kamiokande consists of 11,146 light detectors called photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The experiment began in 1996 and stopped in 2001 after roughly half of the PMTs imploded in a chain reaction. After about a year, technicians repaired the detector.
Kamioka Observatory/ICRR (Institute for Cosmic Ray Research)/The University of Tokyo
Ever since neutrino physics took off in the 1970s, scientists have built detectors to find the elusive particles. And the detectors just keep getting bigger and bigger. Here is a list of many neutrino detectors — the past, present, and future. They range in size, material, and detection method.

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