Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

Name that crater

These six maps will get you started observing the Moon.
The Moon
This photo of the Moon was captured through the telescope at the Kirdkao Observatory.
Wiphu Rujopakarn
For the February 2010 issue of Astronomy, I wrote a story entitled "10 tips for Moon watchers." Because it was only a 2-page feature, we didn't have room to reproduce labeled Moon maps. We have no such space limitation on Astronomy.com., so here are half a dozen maps to help you Moon watch. In each map, south is up to match the view in a telescope, and east lies to the left.
February 2010 WE moon
Crescent Moon.
NOAO
Crescent Moon
The first map, "Crescent Moon," shows Earth's nearest celestial neighbor 4 days after New Moon, the point at which the Moon lies between Earth and the Sun and, therefore, is invisible to our view.
February 2010 WE moon
First Quarter Moon.
NOAO
February 2010 WE moon
Waxing Gibbous Moon.
NOAO
First Quarter Moon and Waxing Gibbous Moon
"First Quarter Moon" displays features you can see 7 days after New Moon, and "The Waxing Gibbous Moon" is set for 9 days after New Moon.
February 2010 WE moon
Full Moon.
NOAO
Full Moon
The fourth map, "The Full Moon" shows the entire Moon's face 14 days after New Moon. This is the phase when details are at their minimum because, from the Moon's perspective, the Sun is directly overhead and shadows are shortest.
February 2010 WE moon
Last Quarter Moon.
NOAO
February 2010 WE moon
Waning Gibbous Moon.
NOAO
Waning Gibbous Moon and Last Quarter Moon
The last two maps are "The Waning Gibbous Moon" and "Last Quarter Moon." They show our satellite roughly 20 and 22 days after New Moon.
Before, or even as, you observe the Moon, review the 10 observing tips I listed in the February issue. Take your time, and by all means have fun.
0

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Read and share your comments on this article
Comment on this article
Want to leave a comment?
Only registered members of Astronomy.com are allowed to comment on this article. Registration is FREE and only takes a couple minutes.

Login or Register now.
0 comments
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
RCLP_ASY_0919_mediumrectangle
NASA's greatest space probes. What Cassini, Juno, and New Horizons discovered on their missions.
Find us on Facebook