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The top astronomy photographs of 2020

Each year, astrophotographers compete for the Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year award. Check out this year’s winning entries.

RELATED TOPICS: IMAGING
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Nicolas Lefaudeux

The Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition recognizes the most stunning images produced each year by professional and amateur astroimagers across the globe. This competition, now in its twelfth year, attracted more than 5,000 entries from six continents in 2020. Judges narrowed down the images by category, including aurorae, the Moon, skyscapes, and more. The top three to five images in each category received awards.

Curious fans are in London, England, can visit the contest’s physical exhibit at the National Maritime Museum. But while travel restrictions may make it harder to see the photos in person, you can also purchase the official book, which includes all the winning images, released by the museum.

Below are some of the highest-rated images from the 2020 competition. Photographers interested in submitting their work for next year’s competition can find more information here.

Nicolas Lefaudeux

Andromeda Galaxy at Arm's Length?

Have you ever dreamt of touching a galaxy? This version of the Andromeda Galaxy seems to be at arm’s length among clouds of stars. Unfortunately, this is just an illusion, as the galaxy is still 2 million light years away. In order to obtain the tilt-shift effect, the photographer 3D-printed a part to hold the camera at an angle at the focus of the telescope. The blur created by the defocus at the edges of the sensor gives this illusion of closeness to Andromeda.
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