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WATCH: Windy weather forces SpaceX to temporarily scrub SN9 test flight

SN9 is expected to try to fly again later this week, as the company has extended road closures in Boca Chica until Friday, January 29.
RELATED TOPICS: PRIVATE SPACEFLIGHT
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SN8 performing the bellyflop maneuver during its flight test on December 6.

SpaceX
[Editor’s note: This article will be updated as new information becomes available.
  • January 25, 2:40 p.m. CST — SpaceX has scrubbed the launch of SN9 planned for today. Instead, they are expected to launch at some point Tuesday, January 26 — weather permitting.]
  • January 26, 12:30 p.m. CST — SN9 will not on Tuesday, January 26, due to weather. SpaceX has extended the road closures in Boca Chica until Friday, January 29.
  • January 27 10:45 a.m. CST - SpaceX's founder, Elon Musk, announced the crew was waiting for FFA approval in order to test SN9 today, via Twitter.

SN9, the ninth prototype of SpaceX’s Starship, was scheduled to perform a test flight today, launching from Boca Chica, Texas. However, high winds forced SpaceX to abandon their test. The company carved out a six-hour launch window this afternoon, but mother nature had other plans. The area was plagued by windy weather throughout the day, and although the company had hoped the winds would die down by around 3 p.m., they persisted. 

SN9 is expected to try to fly again later this week, as the company has extended road closures in Boca Chica until Friday, January 29. 

SpaceX carried out their last flight test of Starship on December 9, launching their previous prototype, SN8, almost 8 miles into the air. After reaching its peak altitude, the giant rocket performed a bellyflop maneuver to slow its descent before reorienting into the upright position to attempt a landing. However, SN8 was unable to slow down enough to safely land, instead exploding as it slammed into the landing pad. SN9 will mimic the same flight plan as SN8 — of course, hopefully without the fiery ending.
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