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Astronomy tests Celestron's StarSense

This accessory allows you to transform your old go-to mount into one that aligns itself.
RELATED TOPICS: CELESTRON | ACCESSORIES
Celestron's StarSense allows you to transform your old go-to mount into one that aligns itself.
Adding Celestron's StarSense AutoAlign accessory to one of the company's older telescopes lets you align its go-to drive much more easily than before.
Celestron

One of the tasks stargazers find most time-consuming is aiming a telescope toward an intended target. Go-to technology revolutionized amateur astronomy when it first appeared more than two decades ago. But most go-to mounts still required the user to initialize the system by aiming at several alignment stars.

In an effort to make setup easier, many next-generation go-to mounts now do most of this initialization automatically. This equipment requires minimal action on the user’s part other than setting up the mount, flicking a switch, and sometimes entering time, date, and location.

But what about those of us who already own older go-to mounts? To enjoy these state-of-the-art features, do we have to buy new ones? Not necessarily. That’s the beauty of the new StarSense AutoAlign add-on from Celestron.

By mounting the AutoAlign unit on your telescope in place of the finder scope and then plugging it into your older Celestron mount’s auxiliary inputs, Star-Sense technology will automatically align the mount in a matter of minutes.
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